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Which Table Saw Blade to Use? – Everything You Need to Know

table saw blade cover image

When I first started looking for my first Table Saw Blades, it felt like looking for a needle in a hay stack. I felt like everyone had a secret that I didn’t know about, and it didn’t take long before I figured out that pretty much everyone was in a similar boat to me.

Since you’re here, I’m assuming you’re in a similar position and would like some guidance on picking you first table saw blade or maybe buying a different one to the ones you’re used to. So hopefully this article will help you pick what you’re looking for and answer any question you may have without too much trouble.

[Note: This article ended up being  a little lengthy that I initially wanted it to be, but it was necessary. adidas yeezy 700 v3 kallax korkekiilto hylly blogspot zara long jumpsuit in green bose quietcomfort 35 usa price nike air max 1 ultra moire black white ราคา custom baseball uniforms air nike sneakers pallone calcio a 11 nike calças de treino cheap yeezys дамски памучен чорапогащник amazon massaggiatore anticellulite amazon miroir terzo converse lugged beige nike air max 1 ultra moire black white ราคา

Overview

Table saw blades are mounted circular cutting tools for table saws. It is used to cut materials like wood, metal, and other things into straight, precise slices. Table saw blades come in a wide range of sizes, from small blades for handheld saws to larger blades for industrial and commercial uses.
Additionally, they come in a variety of tooth configurations, including crosscut, rip, and combination blades, each of which is designed for a specific cutting task. The table saw blade selection is influenced by the type of material being cut as well as the desired result. Proper installation and maintenance are crucial for precise cuts and extending the life of the blade.

Different Table Saw Blade types and their uses

There are several different types of table saw blades designed for specific cutting tasks. It’s important to choose the right blade for the job to get the best results and to extend the life of the blade.

  1. Crosscut blades: These blades have fine, closely spaced teeth and are designed for making crosscuts, or cuts across the grain, in wood and other soft materials.
  2. Rip blades: These blades have fewer, wider spaced teeth and are designed for making rip cuts, or cuts with the grain, in wood.
  3. Combination blades: As the name suggests, combination blades are a hybrid of crosscut and rip blades and are suitable for both types of cuts. They are a good choice for general-purpose woodworking.
  4. Dado blades: Dado blades are specially designed to cut grooves or dado joints in wood. They consist of a set of chipper blades that remove the material between two cutting blades.
  5. Plywood blades: These blades are designed to cut through plywood and other sheet goods without chipping or splintering therear ram  cablu jack 3.5 rca  air max 90 chambray  שושי שרביט שפירא  obelink tipi tent  camas mayor  боя червена  אדידס מעצבים קטלוג  מה תפקידו של צינור אוויר במערכת אינסטלציה  fjällräven parkas dam  brita wasserentkalker  אוזניות מעולות לאמפי 3  זכוכית מים  adidas adizero a170 6050 s  bauchtasche frauen  thin veneers.
  6. Thin-kerf blades: Thin-kerf blades are designed for use on table saws with limited horsepower, as they require less power to drive the blade. They are also lighter and create less waste compared to standard kerf blades. Thin-kerf blades are a good choice for hobbyists and DIY enthusiasts, as they are more economical and require less power to operate.
  7. Laminate blades: These blades are designed for cutting laminates, such as formica and other composite materials, without chipping.
  8. Metal-cutting blades: Metal-cutting blades are designed for cutting non-ferrous metals, such as aluminum and copper, and have teeth made of carbide or diamond.
  9. Nail-embedded wood blades: These blades are designed for cutting wood that contains nails or other foreign objects, and have teeth that are resistant to damage from these objects.
  10. Specialty blades: There are many other specialty blades available, including blades for making bevel cuts, blades for cutting plastic, and blades for cutting tile and stone.

How to decide which table saw blade to use?

To decide which table saw blade you need, there are two main factors to consider:

  1. Material to be cut: Different blades are designed for specific materials, such as wood, metal, laminates, and composites. Choose a blade that is appropriate for the material you will be cutting.
  2. Cutting purpose: Consider the type of cuts you will be making and choose a blade that is designed for that purpose. For example, a crosscut blade for crosscuts, a rip blade for rip cuts, and a combination blade for.

The following section I’m going to layout in a question and answer template based on the questions I’ve had to find answers for myself as well as questions I get asked by other people, to make it easy to explain.

FAQs (15+ Questions Answered)

1. Are table saw blades universal?

Unfortunately no, you cannot use any table saw blade with any table saw model. The blade size, arbor size, and number of teeth must be compatible with your table saw in order to use it properly and safely.

The arbor is the shaft that holds the blade in place, and it must match the size of the blade in order for the blade to spin properly.
Different table saw models have different arbor sizes, so it’s important to check the specifications of both your table saw and your blade before making a purchase. Some table saws can accommodate different blade sizes, but others are designed for a specific size. If you’re unsure what size blade your table saw requires, consult the owner’s manual or contact the manufacturer for more information.

It’s also important to consider the type of cutting you’ll be doing when selecting a blade. Different blades are designed for different materials and applications, such as cross-cutting, ripping, or cutting delicate materials. Choosing the right blade for the job will ensure that you get the best results and help extend the life of your blade.

2. Are table saw blades reverse threaded?

Nope, Table saw blades are not reverse threaded. The threads on the arbor of the saw, which is the part of the saw that holds the blade in place, are standard threads that are designed to turn in a clockwise direction. When installing a blade on a table saw, you will need to ensure that it is tightened onto the arbor in a clockwise direction.

To remove a blade from the arbor, you will need to loosen it by turning it counter clockwise. It is important to use the appropriate tools and follow the manufacturer’s instructions when installing or removing a blade from a table saw, as improper installation or removal can result in injury or damage to the saw.

3. Can table saw blades be sharpened?

Sure then can. However, it has to be done right to make sure you don’t damage the blade. To make sure I don’t derail this article, I have written a separate article detailing ‘How to Sharpen a Table Saw Blade‘.

4. When to sharpen table saw blade?

When you notice a drop in cut quality or an increase in blade friction, you should sharpen your table saw blade. Typical signs that a blade could require sharpening include:

  • Teeth that are dull or damaged: A blade’s teeth that are dull or chipped will no longer produce precise, clean cuts.
  • Burn marks on the wood: If you see burn marks on the wood after cutting, the blade may need to be sharpened since it is dull.
  • Increased friction or binding: The blade may need to be sharpened if it starts to bind or creates more friction than normal.

Generally speaking, depending on the amount of use, you should sharpen your blade once every 1-2 years.

5. Where to sharpen a table saw blade?

There are several options for sharpening a table saw blade:

  1. Do it yourself: With the right tools and some practice, you can sharpen a table saw blade at home. You will need a saw blade sharpening jig and a bench grinder.
  2. Hire a professional: If you don’t have the skills or equipment to sharpen the blade yourself, you can hire a professional sharpening service to do it for you. This is a good option if you have a high-end or specialized blade that you don’t want to damage.
  3. Buy a new blade: If the blade is beyond repair or it’s more cost-effective to replace it, you can simply buy a new blade. This is a good option if you don’t use the saw frequently or if the blade is damaged beyond repair.

Whichever option you choose, make sure to follow proper safety procedures when handling and sharpening the blade to avoid injury.

6. When to replace a table saw blade?

Ideally, you should replace your table saw blade when:

  1. The blade is damaged or bent: If the blade is damaged or bent, it will no longer make accurate cuts and should be replaced.
  2. The blade is worn out: Over time, the teeth of a blade will become dull and worn, reducing its cutting ability. If you notice a significant decrease in the quality of your cuts, it may be time to replace the blade.
  3. The blade is too rusty: If the blade has developed heavy rust, it can affect its performance and should be replaced.
  4. You are changing the type of material you are cutting: If you are switching from cutting wood to metal or vice versa, you may need a different type of blade and should replace the current blade.
  5. You want to upgrade your saw: If you want to improve the performance of your saw, you may consider replacing the blade with a higher-quality or specialized blade.

In general, if your blade is still making accurate cuts and is in good condition, it may be used for several years before it needs to be replaced.

7. Can you put 2 blades on a table saw?

Unfortunately, no, it is not recommended to put two blades on a table saw. Table saws are designed to work with only one blade at a time and adding an additional blade can cause several problems, including:

  • Safety hazard: The added weight and vibrations from two blades can make the saw unstable and increase the risk of kickback and other safety hazards.
  • Poor performance: Running two blades on a table saw can create uneven cuts, increase friction, and cause excessive wear on the blades and the saw.
  • Mechanical damage: Adding an additional blade to a table saw can also cause damage to the saw’s mechanism, including the motor, arbor, and bearings.

It’s best to use only one blade at a time and to choose a blade that is appropriate for the type of cuts you will be making and the material you will be cutting.

8. What is the largest table saw blade I can get?

The largest table saw blade you can buy is typically determined by the size of your table saw’s arbor, which is the shaft that holds the blade in place. Most table saws have an arbor that is either 5/8 inch or 1 inch in diameter, and the maximum size of the blade you can use is limited by the size of the arbor.

Typically, the largest blade size available for a 5/8 inch arbor is 12 inches in diameter, while the largest blade size available for a 1 inch arbor is typically between 12 and 20 inches in diameter.

Arbor Size 12 inch Diameter 10 inch Diameter
⅝ inch Tenryu 12” 100T Carbide Tipped Blade Luckyway 10” 80T Blade

TOMAX 10” 80T Aluminum and Non-Ferrous Metal Saw Blade

Arbor Size 20 inch Diameter 16 inch Diameter 14 inch Diameter
1 inch Freud 20″ 72T General Purpose Blade SUNFUL 80T 16” Blade

Freud 36T 16″ Heavy-Duty Rip Blade

Freud 14” 108T Heavy Duty Rip Blade

SUNFUL 80T 14” Blade

Freud 14” 30T Heavy Duty Rip Blade

It’s important to check the specifications of your saw to determine the size of the arbor and the maximum blade size it can accommodate before purchasing a blade. Using a blade that is too large for your saw can cause damage to the saw and increase the risk of injury.

9. What is table saw blade kerf?

The width of the material removed by the blade when it slices through the wood is referred to as the “kerf” of a table saw blade. The thickness of the blade and the breadth of the teeth together make up the kerf of a blade, which is measured in thousandths of an inch. A table saw blade’s typical kerf width is around 1/8 inch.

The width of the cut and the amount of material taken from the workpiece are both influenced by a blade’s kerf. In contrast to a blade with a larger kerf, which removes more material and produces a wider cut, one with a smaller kerf will remove less material and produce a narrower cut.

A smaller kerf is often more effective since it uses less power from the saw and generates less sawdust. For cutting thicker or tougher materials, a broader kerf could be required as it gives the blade additional stability and support.

It’s vital to take the kerf into account when selecting a blade for your table saw, as well as the sort of cuts you’ll be making and the material you’ll be cutting.

10. What is the difference between a Table saw blade with thin kurf vs full hurf?

On the same not from the previous question, A thin kerf blade has a narrower width, usually around 1/8 inch, and removes less material with each cut. This type of blade is more efficient, as it requires less power from the saw and produces less sawdust. Thin kerf blades are commonly used for cross-cutting and ripping thin or lightweight material.

A full kerf blade has a wider width, usually around 3/16 inch, and removes more material with each cut. This type of blade provides more stability and support, making it better suited for cutting thicker or harder materials. Full kerf blades are commonly used for ripping thick hardwoods and cutting thick materials.

11. Can you stack table saw blades?

I’m afraid not. Stacking blades can cause several problems including safety hazards, poor performance on cuts and even damage the machine. It’s best to use only one blade at a time and to choose a blade that is appropriate for the type of cuts you will be making and the material you will be cutting.

12. Which Table Saw blades should be used for cutting different materials?

Different table saw blades are designed for specific materials and applications. Here are some common materials and the recommended blade types for cutting them:

  • Softwoods: For cutting softwoods like pine and fir, a 40-tooth cross-cut blade or a 24-tooth ripping blade is recommended.
  • Hardwoods: For cutting hardwoods like oak and maple, a 40-tooth cross-cut blade or a 40-tooth or 50-tooth ripping blade is recommended.
  • Laminate flooring: For cutting laminate flooring, a cross-cut blade with 80 or more teeth is recommended.
  • MDF and particleboard: For cutting MDF (medium-density fiberboard) and particleboard, a cross-cut blade with 80 or more teeth or a 24-tooth ripping blade is recommended.
  • Plywood: For cutting plywood, a cross-cut blade with 80 or more teeth or a 40-tooth ripping blade is recommended.
  • Aluminum and non-ferrous metals: For cutting aluminum and non-ferrous metals, a specialized blade with a high tooth count and a low hook angle is recommended.
  • Plastic: For cutting plastic, a cross-cut blade with a high tooth count is recommended.

It’s important to note that some blades are also designed for specific types of cuts, like cross-cutting, ripping, or bevel cutting, and may not be suitable for all materials or applications.

13. What table saw blade is best for ripping?

When it comes to ripping, a good table saw blade should have a high tooth count and a steep hook angle. A high tooth count provides a finer cut, making it easier to control the direction of the blade and to minimize splintering. A steep hook angle ensures that the blade will cut smoothly and quickly through the material, reducing the chances of the blade getting stuck or stalling.

For ripping, a blade with 40-60 teeth is typically recommended. The teeth should be carbide-tipped, which provides longer-lasting sharpness and durability compared to steel-tipped blades. Some of the best blades for ripping include the Forrest WW10407125 Woodworker II 10-Inch 40-tooth ATB, the Freud D1040X Diablo 10-Inch 40-tooth ATB, and the DeWalt DW3106P5 60-Tooth Crosscutting and 32-Tooth General Purpose 10-Inch Saw Blade.

It’s important to note that the specific blade you choose will also depend on the type of wood you are working with, as well as the thickness of the material. For example, if you are working with dense hardwoods, you may want to consider a blade with a higher tooth count for a finer cut.

14. How to change a table saw blade without a wrench?

If you don’t have a blade wrench, there are some other methods to change the blade on your table saw. Hopefully one of these options will work.

  1. Use a socket wrench: If you have a socket set, you can try using a socket that fits over the blade bolt. Make sure to choose the right size socket so it fits snugly over the blade bolt.
  2. Use pliers: If you don’t have a socket set, you can try using pliers. Make sure to wrap the jaws of the pliers with a cloth to prevent damage to the blade or the bolt.
  3. Use a vise grip: A vise grip is another alternative that you can use to loosen the blade bolt. Make sure to wrap the jaws of the vise grip with a cloth to prevent damage to the blade or the bolt.
  4. Use a hammer and chisel: If you don’t have any of the above tools, you can use a hammer and a chisel to loosen the bolt. Place the chisel on the bolt and tap gently with a hammer to loosen the bolt.

15. Which direction to have the table saw blade?

Table saw blades are designed to rotate in one direction, typically clockwise. When installing a new blade, it’s important to make sure that it is rotated in the correct direction, which is usually indicated by an arrow or other marking on the blade.

Failing to install the blade in the correct direction can result in decreased performance and potentially dangerous situations. Before installing a new blade, consult the owner’s manual for your specific table saw model to ensure that you are installing the blade correctly.

Table Saw Blades Troubleshooting Guide

1. Why does my table saw blade wobble?

  • Dull blade: A dull blade can cause the saw to vibrate and wobble, causing the cuts to be uneven. Consider sharpening the blade or replacing it if necessary.
  • Bent blade: If the blade is bent, it will cause the saw to wobble. Replace the blade if it is bent.
  • Blade not tightened properly: Make sure that the blade is tight on the arbor. If the blade is loose, tighten the arbor nut to secure the blade.
  • Table not level: Check to make sure that the table is level and that the blade is parallel to the table. If necessary, adjust the table to level it.

2. My Table Saw blade keeps lowering while cutting. How do I fix it?

  • Loose blade: Make sure that the blade is tight on the arbor. If the blade is loose, tighten the arbor nut to secure the blade.
  • Loose arbor nut: Check the arbor nut to make sure it’s tight. If it’s loose, tighten it to secure the blade.
  • Worn bearings: If the bearings that support the arbor are worn, they can cause the blade to drop. Consider replacing the bearings.
  • Blade not balanced: If the blade is not balanced, it can cause the blade to drop. Consider balancing the blade or replacing it if necessary.

3. My table saw blade keeps coming loose. What do I do?

  • Loose arbor nut: Check the arbor nut to make sure it’s tight. If it’s loose, tighten it to secure the blade.
  • Worn arbor: If the arbor is worn, it may not be able to hold the blade securely. Consider replacing the arbor.
  • Blade not tightened properly: Make sure that the blade is tight on the arbor. If the blade is loose, tighten the arbor nut to secure the blade.

4. My table saw blade is not spinning. How do I fix it?

  • Dull blade: A dull blade can cause the cuts to be uneven. Consider sharpening the blade or replacing it if necessary.
  • Bent blade: If the blade is bent, it will cause the cuts to be uneven. Replace the blade if it is bent.
  • Table not level: Check to make sure that the table is level and that the blade is parallel to the table. If necessary, adjust the table to level it.

5. Table saw blade is not 90 degrees!

  1. Check the blade: Before making any adjustments, inspect the blade for any visible damage, such as warping or bending. If the blade is damaged, replace it with a new one.
  2. Check the blade alignment: Make sure the blade is aligned properly with the miter slot. To do this, use a combination square to measure the distance between the miter slot and the blade. Adjust the blade until it is perpendicular to the miter slot.
  3. Check the bevel adjustment mechanism: If the blade is not 90 degrees, you may need to adjust the bevel angle. Check the bevel adjustment mechanism to make sure it is functioning properly.
  4. Check the blade plate: Make sure the blade plate is flat and not warped. If it is warped, replace it.
  5. Check the arbor: Make sure the arbor is straight and not bent. If it is bent, replace it.
  6. Check the trunnion: Make sure the trunnion is not loose or damaged. If it is, tighten it or replace it as needed.

6. Table saw blade won’t lower or will not raise.

Follow these steps to resolve;

  1. Check the blade guard: Make sure the blade guard is not blocking the blade from lowering. If it is, remove it or adjust it as needed.
  2. Check the blade lock mechanism: Check the mechanism that locks the blade in place to see if it is functioning properly. If it is not, try adjusting or repairing it.
  3. Check the arbor: Make sure the arbor is not bent or damaged, as this can prevent the blade from lowering. If it is bent or damaged, replace it.
  4. Check the trunnion: Make sure the trunnion is not loose or damaged, as this can also prevent the blade from lowering. If it is loose or damaged, tighten it or replace it as needed.
  5. Check the height adjustment mechanism: Check the mechanism that controls the height of the blade to make sure it is functioning properly. If it is not, try adjusting or repairing it.
  6. Check the power source: Make sure the saw is properly connected to a power source and that the power source is functioning properly.

7. My Table saw blade is not parallel to the miter slot!

Here are some steps to resolve a table saw blade that is not parallel to the miter slot:

  1. Check the blade alignment: Make sure the blade is not bent or out of alignment, which can cause it to be off-parallel with the miter slot. If it is, straighten or replace it as needed.
  2. Check the miter slot: Make sure the miter slot is not damaged or out of alignment, as this can also cause the blade to be off-parallel. If it is, repair or replace it as needed.
  3. Check the fence: Make sure the fence is properly aligned with the blade and miter slot, and that it is not warped or damaged. If it is, adjust or replace it as needed.
  4. Check the blade guard: Make sure the blade guard is not blocking the blade or interfering with its alignment. If it is, remove or adjust it as needed.
  5. Check the table: Make sure the table is flat and level, and that it is not warped or damaged. If it is, repair or replace it as needed.
  6. Check the height adjustment mechanism: Make sure the mechanism that controls the height of the blade is functioning properly and that it is not causing the blade to be out of parallel with the miter slot. If it is, adjust or repair it as needed.

8. My table saw blade is stuck! How to get it unstuck?

  1. Unplug the saw: Before attempting any repairs, always unplug the saw to prevent accidents.
  2. Check the blade guard: Make sure the blade guard is not blocking the blade or interfering with its movement. If it is, remove or adjust it as needed.
  3. Check for debris: Check for any debris, such as sawdust, chips, or wood fibers, that may be clogging the blade or preventing it from moving. Clean the blade and surrounding areas as needed.
  4. Check the blade and arbor: Make sure the blade and arbor are not bent or damaged, which can cause the blade to become stuck. If they are, replace them as needed.
  5. Check the height adjustment mechanism: Make sure the mechanism that controls the height of the blade is functioning properly and not causing the blade to become stuck. If it is not, adjust or repair it as needed.
  6. Check the tension: Make sure the blade is properly tensioned, as a loose blade can cause it to become stuck. If the blade is loose, tighten it according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
  7. Lubricate the mechanism: Apply a small amount of oil or lubricant to the height adjustment mechanism and any other moving parts to help ensure smooth operation

9. My Table saw blade is not square. How do I fix it?

  1. Inspect the blade: Make sure that the blade is not bent or damaged, which can cause it to be misaligned. If it is, you should replace it.
  2. Check the arbor: Ensure that the arbor is not bent or damaged, which can result in the blade becoming misaligned. If it is, replace it.
  3. Examine the blade collar: Make sure that the blade collar is tightened and not causing the blade to be misaligned. If it is loose, tighten it as instructed by the manufacturer.
  4. Look at the blade guard: Make sure that the blade guard is not interfering with the blade or causing it to be misaligned. If it is, remove it or adjust it as necessary.
  5. Assess the miter gauge: Ensure that the miter gauge is not bent or damaged, which can cause the blade to be misaligned. If it is, replace it or make adjustments as necessary.
  6. Check the fence: Ensure that the fence is not bent or damaged, which can result in the blade becoming misaligned. If it is, replace it or make adjustments as needed.
  7. Calibrate the saw: Utilize a combination square or another precise measuring tool to calibrate the saw and guarantee that the blade is square.